Sunday, 24 September 2017

Imagining the Revolution.

In this centennial anniversary of the Russian Revolution, David Ruccio asks:

It's clear that people are unhappy with capitalism. And yet, Ruccio's question is a really difficult one to answer.

Tuesday, 19 September 2017

American Races.


As a foreigner, I find the American race debate perplexing.

Mind you, as a foreigner, that's none of my business. If that works for Americans, by all means, carry on. Besides, don't get me wrong, I'm sure there are many historical reasons for that (some of them no doubt much better than others), reasons that a foreigner cannot understand.

That said, I cannot help feeling that the effective level of factual information on race Americans demonstrate seems to fall short of the interest on racial matters they manifest. And I'm not talking about esoteric discussions on the science of race, no siree.

Want to see what I'm talking about?

Thursday, 14 September 2017

Dany le Caméléon et L'Iconnu du PCF.


"On a cold day last fall [1977], Santiago Carrillo, the leader of the so-called Communist Party of Spain (PCE), crossed the picket lines of striking Yale University workers in New Haven, in order to give a speech on the campus. When asked how a 'communist' could scab on a workers' struggle in this way, he replied that his speech was more important than the strike of the custodial workers. Besides, he added, the American labor movement is 'reactionary anyway.'
"The incident shed some light on the class character of Carrillo and his cohorts in other European countries, such as Berlinguer in Italy and Marchais in France. While they like to describe themselves as 'Eurocommunists,' they are really nothing more than scabs on the workers' movement." (here)

That's how Georges Marchais (secretary general of the French Communist Party for 22 years), Santiago Carrillo, and Enrico Berlinguer are remembered, that is, when they are remembered, because they are mostly forgotten. The so-called Eurocommunist movement which they led, itself largely a long-lost memory, attempted to adopt New Left ideas.